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Five Personal Encounters With Marine Life in Queensland

07 Jun

The following blog was posted by the good folks at Easier Travel.  For all you animal lovers out there planning a trip to Queensland, we thought you’d find it interesting. Humpback Whales have already started migrating up the east coast of Australia – and can be seen breaching off Fraser Island.  They begin their return journey in July… and that’s when the fun begins.  (June 2012).

From the Tropical North to the islands of the Whitsundays, Queensland has over 7400km of coastline inhabited by hundreds of species of marine wildlife. A trip down under is the perfect opportunity to get up close and personal with these unique creatures, such as the colossal humpback whale on the Fraser Coast or century old turtles at Mont Repos beach in Bundaberg. Here is an animal lover’s guide to exploring Queensland’s marine life.

BluedogTourAug2011 1

Harvey and the Humpbacks of Hervey Bay

Humpback Whales on Fraser Coast

Seven thousand Humpback whales migrate over a 3,700 mile journey from Antarctica through the Fraser Coast each year. Their pods can be spotted in the shallow coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef but are best seen in the protected waters of Hervey Bay, known as the Whale Watching capital of Australia.  The season kicks off from 1 August until 31 October and sightings are guaranteed!

Kingfisher Bay Resort on Fraser Island offers packages from AUD $379 per person, including 2 nights hotel accommodation at the resort, return ferry transfers and a half-day whale watch cruise.

For updates on the gorgeous Humpbacks of Hervey Bay – follow us on Facebook, Twitter or visit www.whalewatch.com.au.

Dolphin feeding on Moreton Island

Take a relaxing cruise from Brisbane across Moreton Bay to Moreton Island. Take your pick of personal encounters with feeding in-shore dolphins as they swim up to the beach or joining the marine eco cruise journeying south along the western coastline of Moreton Island in search dugongs, dolphins, green sea turtles, sea cucumbers and stingrays.

Tours are available year-round.

Green Sea Turtle

Green Sea Turtle

Turtle Encounters in Bundaberg

Queensland is home to a large variety of turtles such as the loggerhead, green, leatherback and flatback, with some as old as 200 years.

From November to March every year, you can witness one of the true wonders of the natural world up close as hundreds of turtles return to the bountiful waters of Australia’s best known and most accessible sea turtle rookery, Mont Repos, just 15 kilometres from Bundaberg in the south.

Tours depart at 6:45pm from the Mont Repos information centre and cost AUD $10.20 (£6.36).

Visit bookbundabergregion.com.au and learn more about the turtle’s lifecycle.

Swim eye to eye with dwarf minke whales in Cairns

Experience the nature of the seven-tonne dwarf minke whales in an environment that is both awe-inspiring and educational. It is not unusual for these gentle giants to come within a metre of snorkelers for an eye to eye encounter.

Eye to Eye Marine Encounters offers four to six day dwarf minke whale expeditions over six weeks in June and July (just prior to the Hervey Bay Whale Watch season, which splashes down on 1 August every year).  Join founder John Rumney and his team of dedicated guides with over 15 years reef experience, to swim with and study these extraordinary animals.

GBR Clown Fish

GBR Clown Fish

Find Nemo on the Great Barrier Reef

Explore the Low Isles of the Great Barrier Reef, home to the famous clown fish Nemo and his friends from the 2003 film Finding Nemo. (Photo courtesy of animal-unique.blogspot).

Spend a day swimming and snorkelling and learning of the unique marine life and soft coral gardens at the water’s edge.  Quicksilver tours are available year round.

Click to read the full blog (portions have been edited).

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Posted by on June 7, 2012 in Guest Bloggers

 

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